14 February, 2007

Globalization of Valentines Day

Khaleej Times - "An overwhelming 62 per cent of the Arabs referred to themselves as ‘romantic people’. And 56 per cent claimed they had never celebrated Valentine’s Day before. But a whopping 69 per cent said they planned to do something special this year for their loved ones. ... The results of the survey indicated that among the respondents, Moroccans, Lebanese and Egyptians were most likely to celebrate the Valentine’s Day. Citizens of the six GCC countries were the least effusive."

Gulf News: "Among the specialists gearing up for the second busiest time of the year, after Christmas, is Gulf Greetings. With more than 50 outlets all over the region, the company is expecting to shift around 150,000 cards this Valentine's Day. And the man managing Gulf Greetings' Hallmark category is none other than the aptly named Valentine Braganza. The 38-year-old, originally from India...."

Read Gulf News on the history of St. Valentines Day.

One American's naive astonishment at the popularity of Valentines Day in Dubai.

The world, though, is not yet flat. The transmission of culture in going one way - absorption of Western (Christian) holidays in the Islamic world. We see Middle Eastern food becoming popular in Europe and North America, but we don't have potent examples like the popularity of Christmas and Valentines.

6 comments:

Kishor Cariappa said...

I can understand UAE, the most cosmopolitan of the Gulf states, getting into V-Day mode. You will be surprised to know that Oman has a lot to offer on Valentine’s Day – cards, gifts, jewellery, candle-lit dinners, etc – and majority of them are targeted at Omanis. As they say, love has no barriers!

pRoUd said...

The transmission of culture in going one way - absorption of Western (Christian) holidays in the Islamic world. We see Middle Eastern food becoming popular in Europe and North America, but we don't have potent examples like the popularity of Christmas and Valentines.

because, Dear Chilton, we, at least I, refuse to blindly imitate wetsern practices that adds no value to my life. I don't perceive Love as a day to be celebrate. It is ongoing, and a lovely surprise, by definition, comes unplanned and unexpected!

second: you answered your own Qs.
Western (Christian) holidays in the Islamic world.
personally, inshAllah NEVER!
and it only speaks volumes of yourself if you are comparing a religion with food.
Add to that, we dont see the western world celebrating Eid and we have two in a year? Have you?

I have no objections on what the Western world is doing, as long as they are in their own borders.

The world is Flat. Doesnt that make it more INTERESTING?

youtube said...

Great news

HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY.



forex

youtube said...

Great news

HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY.



forex

John B. Chilton said...

proud,

Food and religion were compared because they don't compare.

As long as Western influence is so easily taken up in the Middle East - to the point that it crowds out local heritage - those who are rightly proud of their heritage are going to feel threatened.

B.D. said...

Things often cross borders because of their intrinsic appeal. Only strict laws, traditions and other barriers keep things out. Both Valentines and Christmas, for example, have appealing elements apart from the original religious context. Anyone can participate in a Christmas Sale, Christmas dinner or other event without the slightest regard to its religious or cultural context. If stores presented Eid Sales in New York City, I'm sure a lot of non-Muslims would opt to take part!

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