09 August, 2007

Villa ban for singles

The Municipality is taking stringent measures to ensure that 'bachelors' are evicted from villas.

'Bachelors' are defined by the Head of the Building Inspections Section of Dubai Municipality as "a single person whether married or unmarried, male or female" and includes "executive bachelors" - so if you're a highly paid unmarried CEO, or one whose wife isn't here with you, don't think this only applies to construction labourers - you're out of your home too.

Real estate companies renting villas to singles or companies lodging executive singles in villas are threatened with having their trade licence cancelled.

Singles can live in apartments anywhere in Dubai, but not in villas - bizarre when you consider that villas tend to have space around them while apartment dwellers live in very close proximity.

Another of those blanket laws that hasn't been thought through in a sophisticated enough way.

31 comments:

Joy be upon us all said...

Take notice of Art: 15, 18 and 20 and take legal action and publish the results it in the global mass media.

If the UAE don’t makes progress in Human rights and Liberty there might be a massive global campaign against tourism in the Paternalistic Sharia Desert.



The Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam
Adopted and Issued at the Nineteenth Islamic Conference
of Foreign Ministers in Cairo
on 5 August 1990.
The Member States of the Organization of the Islamic Conference,
Reaffirming the civilizing and historical role of the Islamic Ummah which God made the best nation that has given mankind a universal and well-balanced civilization in which harmony is established between this life and the hereafter and knowledge is combined with faith; and the role that this Ummah should play to guide a humanity confused by competing trends and ideologies and to provide solutions to the chronic problems of this materialistic civilization.
Wishing to contribute to the efforts of mankind to assert human rights, to protect man from exploitation and persecution, and to affirm his freedom and right to a dignified life in accordance with the Islamic Shari’ah
Convinced that mankind which has reached an advanced stage in materialistic science is still, and shall remain, in dire need of faith to support its civilization and of a self-motivating force to guard its rights;
Believing that fundamental rights and universal freedoms in Islam are an integral part of the Islamic religion and that no one as a matter of principle has the right to suspend them in whole or in part or violate or ignore them in as much as they are binding divine commandments, which are contained in the Revealed Books of God and were sent through the last of His Prophets to complete the preceding divine messages thereby making their observance an act of worship and their neglect or violation an abominable sin, and accordingly every person is individually responsible — and the Ummah collectively responsible — for their safeguard.
Proceeding from the above-mentioned principles,
Declare the following:
Article 1
(a) All human beings form one family whose members are united by submission to God and descent from Adam. All men are equal in terms of basic human dignity and basic obligations and responsibilities, without any discrimination on the grounds of race, colour, language, sex, religious belief, political affiliation, social status or other considerations. True faith is the guarantee for enhancing such dignity along the path to human perfection.
(b) All human beings are God’s subjects, and the most loved by him are those who are most useful to the rest of His subjects, and no one has superiority over another except on the basis of piety and good deeds.
Article 2
(a) Life is a God-given gift and the right to life is guaranteed to every human being. It is the duty of individuals, societies and states to protect this right from any violation, and it is prohibited to take away life except for a Shari’ah-prescribed reason.
(b) It is forbidden to resort to such means as may result in the genocidal annihilation of mankind.
(c) The preservation of human life throughout the term of time willed by God is a duty prescribed by Shari’ah.
(d) Safety from bodily harm is a guaranteed right. It is the duty of the state to safeguard it, and it is prohibited to breach it without a Shari’ah-prescribed reason.
Article 3
(a) In the event of the use of force and in case of armed conflict, it is not permissible to kill non-belligerents such as old men, women and children. The wounded and the sick shall have the right to medical treatment; and prisoners of war shall have the right to be fed, sheltered and clothed. It is prohibited to mutilate dead bodies. It is a duty to exchange prisoners of war and to arrange visits or reunions of the families separated by the circumstances of war.
(b) It is prohibited to fell trees, to damage crops or livestock, and to destroy the enemy’s civilian buildings and installations by shelling, blasting or any other means.
Article 4
Every human being is entitled to inviolability and the protection of his good name and honour during his life and after his death. The state and society shall protect his remains and burial place.
Article 5
(a) The family is the foundation of society, and marriage is the basis of its formation. Men and women have the right to marriage, and no restrictions stemming from race, colour or nationality shall prevent them from enjoying this right.
(b) Society and the State shall remove all obstacles to marriage and shall facilitate marital procedure. They shall ensure family protection and welfare.
Article 6
(a) Woman is equal to man in human dignity, and has rights to enjoy as well as duties to perform; she has her own civil entity and financial independence, and the right to retain her name and lineage.
(b) The husband is responsible for the support and welfare of the family.
Article 7
(a) As of the moment of birth, every child has rights due from the parents, society and the state to be accorded proper nursing, education and material, hygienic and moral care. Both the fetus and the mother must be protected and accorded special care.
(b) Parents and those in such like capacity have the right to choose the type of education they desire for their children, provided they take into consideration the interest and future of the children in accordance with ethical values and the principles of the Shari’ah.
(c) Both parents are entitled to certain rights from their children, and relatives are entitled to rights from their kin, in accordance with the tenets of the Shari’ah.
Article 8
Every human being has the right to enjoy his legal capacity in terms of both obligation and commitment. Should this capacity be lost or impaired, he shall be represented by his guardian.
Article 9
(a) The quest for knowledge is an obligation, and the provision of education is a duty for society and the State. The State shall ensure the availability of ways and means to acquire education and shall guarantee educational diversity in the interest of society so as to enable man to be acquainted with the religion of Islam and the facts of the Universe for the benefit of mankind.
(b) Every human being has the right to receive both religious and worldly education from the various institutions of education and guidance, including the family, the school, the university, the media, etc., and in such an integrated and balanced manner as to develop his personality, strengthen his faith in God and promote his respect for and defence of both rights and obligations.
Article 10
Islam is the religion of unspoiled nature. It is prohibited to exercise any form of compulsion on man or to exploit his poverty or ignorance in order to convert him to another religion or to atheism.
Article 11
(a) Human beings are born free, and no one has the right to enslave, humiliate, oppress or exploit them, and there can be no subjugation but to God the Most-High.
(b) Colonialism of all types being one of the most evil forms of enslavement is totally prohibited. Peoples suffering from colonialism have the full right to freedom and self-determination. It is the duty of all States and peoples to support the struggle of colonized peoples for the liquidation of all forms of colonialism and occupation, and all States and peoples have the right to preserve their independent identity and exercise control over their wealth and natural resources.
Article 12
Every man shall have the right, within the framework of Shari’ah, to free movement and to select his place of residence whether inside or outside his country and, if persecuted, is entitled to seek asylum in another country. The country of refuge shall ensure his protection until he reaches safety, unless asylum is motivated by an act which Shari’ah regards as a crime.

Article 13
Work is a right guaranteed by the State and Society for each person able to work. Everyone shall be free to choose the work that suits him best and which serves his interests and those of society. The employee shall have the right to safety and security as well as to all other social guarantees. He may neither be assigned work beyond his capacity nor be subjected to compulsion or exploited or harmed in any way. He shall be entitled — without any discrimination between males and females — to fair wages for his work without delay, as well as to the holidays, allowances and promotions which he deserves. For his part, he shall be required to be dedicated and meticulous in his work. Should workers and employers disagree on any matter, the State shall intervene to settle the dispute and have the grievances redressed, the rights confirmed and justice enforced without bias.
Article 14
Everyone shall have the right to legitimate gains without monopolization, deceit or harm to oneself or to others. Usury (riba) is absolutely prohibited.
Article 15
(a) Everyone shall have the right to own property acquired in a legitimate way, and shall be entitled to the rights of ownership, without prejudice to oneself, others or to society in general. Expropriation is not permissible except for the requirements of public interest and upon payment of immediate and fair compensation
(b) Confiscation and seizure of property is prohibited except for a necessity dictated by law.
Article 16
Everyone shall have the right to enjoy the fruits of his scientific, literary, artistic or technical production and the right to protect the moral and material interests stemming therefrom, provided that such production is not contrary to the principles of Shari’ah.
Article 17
(a) Everyone shall have the right to live in a clean environment, away from vice and moral corruption, an environment that would foster his self-development; and it is incumbent upon the State and society in general to afford that right.
(b) Everyone shall have the right to medical and social care, and to all public amenities provided by society and the State within the limits of their available resources.
(c) The State shall ensure the right of the individual to a decent living which will enable him to meet all his requirements and those of his dependents, including food, clothing, housing, education, medical care and all other basic needs.
Article 18
(a) Everyone shall have the right to live in security for himself, his religion, his dependents, his honour and his property.
(b) Everyone shall have the right to privacy in the conduct of his private affairs, in his home, among his family, with regard to his property and his relationships. It is not permitted to spy on him, to place him under surveillance or to besmirch his good name. The State shall protect him from arbitrary interference.
(c) A private residence is inviolable in all cases. It will not be entered without permission from its inhabitants or in any unlawful manner, nor shall it be demolished or confiscated and its dwellers evicted.
Article 19
(a) All individuals are equal before the law, without distinction between the ruler and the ruled.
(b) The right to resort to justice is guaranteed to everyone.
(c) Liability is in essence personal.
(d) There shall be no crime or punishment except as provided for in the Shari’ah.
(e) A defendant is innocent until his guilt is proven in a fair trial in which he shall be given all the guarantees of defence.
Article 20
It is not permitted without legitimate reason to arrest an individual, or restrict his freedom, to exile or to punish him. It is not permitted to subject him to physical or psychological torture or to any form of humiliation, cruelty or indignity. Nor is it permitted to subject an individual to medical or scientific experimentation without his consent or at the risk of his health or of his life. Nor is it permitted to promulgate emergency laws that would provide executive authority for such actions.
Article 21
Taking hostages under any form or for any purpose is expressly forbidden.
Article 22
(a) Everyone shall have the right to express his opinion freely in such manner as would not be contrary to the principles of the Shari’ah.
(b) Everyone shall have the right to advocate what is right, and propagate what is good, and warn against what is wrong and evil according to the norms of Islamic Shari’ah.
(c) Information is a vital necessity to society. It may not be exploited or misused in such a way as may violate sanctities and the dignity of Prophets, undermine moral and ethical values or disintegrate, corrupt or harm society or weaken its faith.
(d) It is not permitted to arouse nationalistic or doctrinal hatred or to do anything that may be an incitement to any form of racial discrimination.
Article 23
(a) Authority is a trust; and abuse or malicious exploitation thereof is absolutely prohibited, so that fundamental human rights may be guaranteed.
(b) Everyone shall have the right to participate, directly or indirectly in the administration of his country's public affairs. He shall also have the right to assume public office in accordance with the provisions of Shari'ah.
Article 24
All the rights and freedoms stipulated in this Declaration are subject to the Islamic Shari'ah.
Article 25
The Islamic Shari'ah is the only source of reference for the explanation or clarification to any of the articles of this Declaration.
Cairo, 14 Muharram 1411H
5 August 1990

Joy be upon us all said...

Some critics in addition:

Islamic Human Rights?

In August of 1990, representatives of 54 Muslim countries met in Cairo and signed the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam. Many of these countries did not sign the Universal Declaration of Human Rights sponsored by the UN, admitting that this document was in conflict with Islamic values.

What then are Islamic Human Rights and how do they differ from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)? In the appendix below are both human rights declarations for a quick comparison.

If you look at the preamble of the UDHR, you will see that there is no mention of any religion. All religions and cultures are assumed to be equal. All of humanity are asked to work together to promote “universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms”. But in the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam (hereafter called the Cairo Declaration), we can detect a completely different tone.

Right from the first paragraph of the preamble, the Cairo Declaration confidently asserts the superiority of Islam by referring to the Islamic Ummah as the “best nation”. The Ummah has a historic role to play in guiding “a humanity confused by competing trends and ideologies and to provide solutions to the chronic problems of this materialistic civilization.”

This is no implication, unlike in the UDHR, that all cultures and religions are equal. Indeed the rest of humanity is supposedly confused and in need of guidance from the “best nation”. Right from the start of the Cairo Declaration, it is made clear the world is divided into Muslims and infidels.

Now take a look at Articles 24 and 25 at the end of the Cairo Declaration. You will see that all rights and freedoms and subject to the Islamic Shariah and the Shariah is the only source of reference for the Cairo Declaration. Therefore we must read the rest of the Cairo Declaration with this in mind.

Article 1a states, “All human beings form one family whose members are united by submission to God and descent from Adam.”

This sentence begs the question, “What about non-Muslims who do not submit to Allah?”

Does this not imply that Article 1a is simply telling us that non-Muslims are not part of the family? Article 1a went on to say, “All men are equal in terms of basic human dignity and basic obligations and responsibilities, without any discrimination on the grounds of race, color, language, sex, religious belief, political affiliation, social status or other considerations.”

Take note the word “men” instead of “human beings” was used. In Islam, men and women are seen to have different obligations and responsibilities. Men of course can have four wives but women cannot have four husbands. In the UDHR, gender-neutral terms such as “everyone” or “human beings” are always used.

In addition, Article 1a appears to contradict the preamble and Article 1b, as we will soon see. Article 1a forbids discrimination on the grounds of religious belief, amongst other things. In the preamble and in Article 1b, it is quite clear that Muslims are held to be higher than infidels.

Article 1b states, “ All human beings are God’s subjects, and the most loved by Him are those who are most useful to the rest of His subjects, and no one has superiority over another except on the basis of piety and good deeds.”

Let me remind you that everything in the document is subject to Islamic shariah. This means that Muslims are superior to non-Muslims since infidels cannot be more pious than Muslims. So while Article 1a forbids discrimination on grounds of religious beliefs, Article 1b is doing precisely that. This attitude will strain relations with infidels. This could explain why Muslims are in conflict with non-Muslims in Palestine, Chchenya, Kashmir, South Thailand, Philippines and Sudan.

In contrast, Article 1 of the UDHR tells us all to act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. All religions and cultures are by implication equal and the declaration appeals to us to work together. There is no talk of one group leading the others.

Article 2 of the Cairo Declaration forbids bodily harm or the taking of life unless for a Shariah prescribed reason. This means that you can be killed for criticizing their holy Prophet Mohammed, as there are tough laws against blasphemy in Islam. A good example is the fatwa against Salman Rushdie, condemning him to death.

Article 9 places the duty on the state to give Islamic education to the people. No mention is made, of course, of other religions. It also charges the state with educating the people with worldly education, so long as these do not conflict with Islam, of course. Thus history lessons will necessarily reflect the Islamic world-view. Therefore, children must be taught that the early wars of Arab imperialism were being in accordance with God's wishes. The years before the Arab invasions must be seen as periods of darkness, no matter how great the ancient civilizations were.

The Crusades must be seen as an attack on Islam and not as a desire to recapture lands once belonging to Christians. While, the education system will no doubt emphasize the brutality of the Crusaders, their own Arab invasions of other people's lands, no matter how brutal, must always be framed as bringing the light of Islam to benighted peoples.

This approach makes it difficult for empathy to develop. A child going through such and education system is not encouraged to understand the other side's point of view.

Any sort of historical revisionism will be viewed suspiciously at best or apostasy at worst. Also any teaching of Finance will raise difficulties, if Articles 24 and 25 are vigorously enforced by the signatories. It is part and parcel of the modern business world to deal in interest, which is forbidden. All countries borrow money and most companies also do so to conduct business.

Thus, I pity the Finance professor of a business school who must teach the valuation of bonds in an Islamic fashion. How are you going to calculate the Net Present Value of an asset without an interest rate?

Lets move on to Article 10, which says, “Islam is the religion of unspoiled nature. It is prohibited to exercise any form of compulsion on man or to exploit his poverty or ignorance in order to convert him to another religion or to atheism.”

Since Islam is the truth, a Muslim must be truly ignorant to want to convert to another religion. Therefore, what this means is that Muslims are not allowed to convert. The penalty of apostasy, according to Shariah, is death. Article 10 is actually superfluous, since Article 24 says that everything in the Cairo declaration must be subject to Shariah.

There is of course no protection for non-Muslims being forcibly converted to Islam and no provisions to protect him or her from her own ignorance or poverty. Besides this, Article 10 is actually a restriction and not a right. A right is an entitlement to something beneficial. By restricting somebody's free choice, you are taking something away from him. Article 10 is of course in contradiction to Article 18 of the UDHR:

“Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.”

Article 11a of the Cairo Declaration states:

“Human beings are born free, and no one has the right to enslave, humiliate, oppress or exploit them, and there can be no subjugation but to God the Most-high.”

That sounds reasonable in theory, except that Allah does not make personal appearances. So in practice, people will act in His Most-high name to subjugate you. This has already happen in Iran and in any Islamic state. This Article has the potential to limit your freedom of religion since guardians of the Islamic state will be telling you how to practice your religion. Article 11a effectively gives those in authority the right to subjugate you in the name of God.

Article 14 of the Cairo Declaration prohibits usury. Again, this is a restriction and not a right. It may be fruitful to enquire as to how the scholars who wrote this Declaration could confuse rights with restrictions. A psychological study into this may give us an insight into their minds. Perhaps, the scholars think that it everybody's right to submit to Allah and this must necessarily means obedience to His laws. Hence submission equals liberation.

Article 19a of the Cairo Declaration states:

“All individuals are equal before the law, without distinction between ruler and ruled.”

This Article makes reference to rulers and the ruled and makes no reference between man and woman. According to Shariah, a woman's testimony in court is worth that of half a man's. Thus Article 19a does not give women equal rights before the law.

Article 19d of the Cairo Declaration states:

“There shall be no crime or punishment except as provided for in the Shariah.”

This means that stoning for adultery and amputation for theft is allowed and even encouraged. Stoning is a slow and painful way to die. Therefore Article 19d is in conflict with Article 5 of the UDHR which states:

“No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”

These are the main differences between the Cairo Declaration and the UDHR. The differences are not immediately apparent. Rights that appear to be given are taken away by clauses 24 and 25. That is the fine print. Perhaps the people who wrote the Cairo Declaration were aware of the wide gulf in their conception of human rights and did not want to highlight it.

To sum up, the Cairo Declaration allows stoning as punishment, prohibits Muslims from changing their religion, prohibits usury, does not give women equal rights and divides the world between Muslims and infidels. It makes it clear that Muslims are the “best nation” whose duty it is to make you become like them. While it is supposedly a document about rights, it also a document containing restrictions. The Cairo Declaration of Human Rights in Islam is a harsh document that comes from a harsh faith.

Appendix

Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam

The Member States of the Organization of the Islamic Conference,
Reaffirming the civilizing and historical role of the Islamic Ummah which God made the best nation that has given mankind a universal and well-balanced civilization in which harmony is established between this life and the hereafter and knowledge is combined with spiritual faith; and the role that this Ummah should play to guide a humanity confused by competing trends and ideologies and to provide solutions to the chronic problems of this materialistic civilization.
Wishing to contribute to the efforts of mankind to assert human rights, to protect man from exploitation and persecution, and to affirm his freedom and right to a dignified life in accordance with the Islamic Shari’ah.
Convinced that mankind which has reached an advanced stage in materialistic science is still, and shall remain, in dire need of faith to support its civilization and of a self motivating force to guard its rights.
Believing that fundamental rights and universal freedoms in Islam are an integral part of the Islamic religion and that no one as a matter of principle has the right to suspend them in whole or in part or violate or ignore them in as much as they are binding divine commandments, which are contained in the Revealed Books of God and were sent through the last of His Prophets to complete the preceding divine messages thereby making their observance and act of worship and their neglect or violation an abominable sin, and accordingly every person is individually responsible -and the Ummah collectively responsible- for their safeguard.
Proceeding from the above-mentioned principles,
Declare the following :
ARTICLE 1 :
a) All human beings form one family whose members are united by submission to God and descent from Adam. All men are equal in terms of basic human dignity and basic obligations and responsibilities, without any discrimination on the grounds of race, colour, language, sex, religious belief, political affiliation, social status or other conside-rations. True faith is the guarantee for enhancing such dignity along the path to human perfection.
b) All human beings are God’s subjects, and the most loved by Him are those who are most useful to the rest of His subjects, and no one has superiority over another except on the basis of piety and good deeds.
ARTICLE 2 :
a) Life is a God-given gift and the right to life is guaranteed to every human being. It is the duty of individuals, societies and states to protect this right from any violation, and it is prohibited to take away life except for a Shari’ah prescribed reason.
b) It is forbidden to resort to such means as may result in the genocidal annihilation of mankind.
c) The preservation of human life throughout the term of time willed by God is a duty prescribed by Shari’ah.
d) Safety from bodily harm is a guaranteed right. It is the duty of the State to safeguard it, and it is prohibited to breach it without a Shari’ah prescribed reason.
ARTICLE 3 :
a) In the event of the use of force and in case of armed conflict, it is not permissible to kill non-belligerents such as old men, women and children. The wounded and the sick shall have the right to medical treatment; and prisoners of war shall have the right to be fed, sheltered and clothed. It is prohibited to mutilate dead bodies. It is a duty to exchange prisoners of war and to arrange visits or reunions of the families separated by the circumstances of war.
b) It is prohibited to fell trees, to damage crops or livestock, and to destroy the enemy’s civilian buildings and instal-lations by shelling, blasting or any other means.
ARTICLE 4 :
Every human being is entitled to the inviolability and the protection of his good name and honour during his life and after his death. The State and Society shall protect his remains and burial place.
ARTICLE 5 :
a) The family is the foundation of society, and marriage is the basis of its formation. Men and women have the right to marriage, and no restrictions stemming from race, colour or nationality shall prevent them from enjoying this right.
b) Society and the State shall remove all obstacles to marriage and shall facilitate marital procedure. They shall ensure family protection and welfare.
ARTICLE 6 :
a) Woman is equal to man in human dignity, and has rights to enjoy as well as duties to perform; she has her own civil entity and financial independence, and the right to retain her name and lineage.
b) The husband is responsible for the support and welfare of the family.
ARTICLE 7 :
a) As of the moment of birth, every child has rights due from the parents, Society and the State to be accorded proper nursing, education and material, hygienic and moral care. Both the fetus and the mother must be protected and accorded special care.
b) Parents and those in such like capacity have the right to choose the type of education they desire for their children, provided they take into consideration the interest and future of the children in accordance with ethical values and the principles of the Shari’ah.
c) Both parents are entitled to certain rights from their children, and relatives are entitled to rights from their kin, in accordance with the tenets of the Shari’ah.
ARTICLE 8 :
Every human being has the right to enjoy his legal capacity in terms of both obligation and commitment, should this capacity be lost or impaired, he shall be represented by his guardian.
ARTICLE 9 :
a) The question for knowledge is an obligation and the provision of education is a duty for Society and the State. The State shall ensure the availability of ways and means to acquire education and shall guarantee educational diver-sity in the interest of Society so as to enable man to be acquainted with the religion of Islam and the facts of the Universe for the benefit of mankind.
b) Every human being has the right to receive both religious and worldly education from the various institutions of, education and guidance, including the family, the school, the university, the media, etc., and in such and integrated and balanced manner as to develop his personality, stren-gthen his faith in God and promote his respect for and defence of both rights and obligations.
ARTICLE 10 :
Islam is the religion of unspoiled nature. It is prohibited to exercise any form of compulsion on man or to exploit his poverty or ignorance in order to convert him to another religion or to atheism.
ARTICLE 11 :
a) Human beings are born free, and no one has the right to enslave, humiliate, oppress or exploit them, and there can be no subjugation but to God the Most-High.
b) Colonialism of all types being one of the most evil forms of enslavement is totally prohibited. Peoples suffering from colonialism have the full right to freedom and self-determination. It is the duty of all states and peoples to support the struggle of colonized peoples from the liqui-dation of all forms of colonialism and occupation, and all states and peoples have the right to preserve their independent identity and exercise control over their wealth and natural resources.
ARTICLE 12 :
Every man shall have the right, within the framework of Shari’ah, to free movement and to select his place of residence whether inside or outside his country and if persecuted, is entitled to seek asylum in another country. The country of refuge shall ensure his protection until he reaches safety, unless asylum is motivated by an act which Shari’ah regards as a crime.
ARTICLE 13 :
Work is a right guaranteed by the State and Society for each person able to work. Everyone shall be free to choose the work that suits him best and which serves his interests and those of Society. The employee shall have the right to safety and security as well as to all other social guarantees. He may neither be assigned work beyond his capacity nor be subjected to compulsion or exploited or harmed in any way. He shall be entitled without any discrimination between males and females - to fair wages for his work without delay, as well as to the holidays allowances and promotions which he deserves. For his part, he shall be required to be dedicated and meticulous in his work. Should workers and employers disagree on any matter, the State shall intervene to settle the dispute and have the grievances redressed, the rights confirmed and justice enforced without bias.
ARTICLE 14 :
Everyone shall have the right to legitimate gains without monopolization, deceit or harm to oneself or to others. Usury (riba) is absolutely prohibited.
ARTICLE 15 :
a) Everyone shall have the right to own property acquired in a legitimate way, and shall be entitled to the rights of ownership, without prejudice to oneself, others or to society in general. Expropriation is not permissible except for the requirements of public interest and upon payment of immediate and fair compensation.
b) Confiscation and seizure of property is prohibited except for a necessity dictated by law.
ARTICLE 16 :
Everyone shall have the right to enjoy the fruits of his scientific, literary, artistic or technical production and the right to protect the moral and material interest stemming therefrom, provided that such production is not contrary to the principles of Shari’ah.
ARTICLE 17 :
a) Everyone shall have the right to live in a clean environment, away from vice and moral corruption, an environment that would foster his self-development and it is incumbent upon the State and Society in general to afford that right.
b) Everyone shall have the right to medical and social care, and to all public amenities provided by Society and the State within the limits of their available resources.
c) The State shall ensure the right of the individual to a decent living which will enable him to meet all his requirements and those of his dependents, including food, clothing, housing, education, medical care and all other basic needs.
ARTICLE 18 :
a) Everyone shall have the right to live in security for himself, his religion, his dependents, his honour and his property.
b) Everyone shall have the right to privacy in the conduct of his private affairs, in his home, among his family, with regard to his property and his relationships. It is not permitted to spy on him, to place him under surveillance or to besmirch his good name. The State shall protect him from arbitrary interference.
c) A private residence is inviolable in all cases. It will not be entered without permission from its inhabitants or in any unlawful manner, nor shall it be demolished or confiscated and its dwellers evicted.
ARTICLE 19 :
a) All individuals are equal before the law, without distinction between ruler and ruled.
b) The right to resort to justice is guaranteed to everyone.
c) Liability is in essence personal.
d) There shall be no crime or punishment except as provided for in the Shari’ah.
e) A defendant is innocent until his guilt is proven in a fair trial in which he shall be given all the guarantees of defence.
ARTICLE 20 :
It is not permitted without legitimate reason to arrest an individual, restrict his freedom, to exile or to punish him. It is not permitted to subject him to physical or psychological torture or to any form of humiliation, cruelty or indignity. Nor is it permitted to subject an individual to medical or scientific experimentation without his consent or at the risk of his health or of his life. Nor is it permitted to promulgate emergency laws that would provide executive authority for such actions.
ARTICLE 21 :
Taking hostages under any form or for any purpose is expressly forbidden.
ARTICLE 22 :
a) Everyone shall have the right to express his opinion freely in such manner as would not be contrary to the principles of the Shari’ah.
b) Everyone shall have the right to advocate what is right, and propagate what is good, and warn against what is wrong and evil according to the norms of Islamic Shari’ah.
c) Information is a vital necessity to Society. It may not be exploited or misused in such a way as may violate sanctities and the dignity of Prophets, undermine moral and ethical values or disintegrate, corrupt or harm Society or weaken its faith.
d) It is not permitted to arouse nationalistic or doctrinal hatred or to do anything that may be an incitement to any form of racial discrimination.
ARTICLE 23 :
a) Authority is a trust; and abuse or malicious exploitation thereof is absolutely prohibited, so that fundamental human rights may be guaranteed.
b) Everyone shall have the right to participate directly or indirectly in the administration of his country’s public affairs. He shall also have the right to assume public office in accordance with the provisions of Shari’ah.
ARTICLE 24 :
All the rights and freedoms stipulated in this Declaration are subject to the Islamic Shari’ah.
ARTICLE 25 :
The Islamic Shari’ah is the only source of reference for the explanation or clarification of any of the articles of this Declaration.



The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

On December 10, 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights the full text of which appears in the following pages. Following this historic act the Assembly called upon all Member countries to publicize the text of the Declaration and "to cause it to be disseminated, displayed, read and expounded principally in schools and other educational institutions, without distinction based on the political status of countries or territories."
PREAMBLE
Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,
Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,
Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law,
Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between nations,
Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,
Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to achieve, in co-operation with the United Nations, the promotion of universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms,
Whereas a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full realization of this pledge,
Now, Therefore THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY proclaims THIS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.
Article 1.
All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
Article 2.
Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.
Article 3.
Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.
Article 4.
No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.
Article 5.
No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.
Article 6.
Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.
Article 7.
All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.
Article 8.
Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.
Article 9.
No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.
Article 10.
Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.
Article 11.
(1) Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.
(2) No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed.
Article 12.
No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.
Article 13.
(1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state.
(2) Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.
Article 14.
(1) Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.
(2) This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.
Article 15.
(1) Everyone has the right to a nationality.
(2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.
Article 16.
(1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.
(2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.
(3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.
Article 17.
(1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.
(2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.
Article 18.
Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.
Article 19.
Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.
Article 20.
(1) Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.
(2) No one may be compelled to belong to an association.
Article 21.
(1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.
(2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.
(3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.
Article 22.
Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.
Article 23.
(1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment.
(2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.
(3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.
(4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.
Article 24.
Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.
Article 25.
(1) Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.
(2) Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.
Article 26.
(1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.
(2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.
(3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.
Article 27.
(1) Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.
(2) Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.
Article 28.
Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.
Article 29.
(1) Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible.
(2) In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society.
(3) These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.
Article 30.
Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.

Anonymous said...

Joy,

All what you have quoted can be put to practice in a legally elected, democratically representative state of affairs. It's not applicable where totalitarian [lifetime] rule is in place.

In other words, all that appears in the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam is just words without action.

Nothing more; nothing less.

However, there are some good Moslems out there; good people, but finding them is like searching for a needle in a haystack.

Anonymous said...

There are some instances where bachelors living in villas are a nuisance.

I'd say, evict them but applying a blanket law is simply ludicrous.

Anonymous said...

@ Anonymous 09 August, 2007 20:55

so ur saying that most muslims are bad? or is it that u want them to be like you to be satisfied?

Ibn Battuta said...

while joy's post is enlightening, a link to the declaration would be more appropriate than filling so much space, particularly on a thread that isn't dealing with human rights or islam, per se.

as for some bachelors being a problem in villas - so are some, actually, many families! having lived in a villa we had an extremely obnoxious australian family across the way and kids every where on their bikes and skateboards making a nuissance - i say put all children in the uae in special homes out in the middle of the desert! keep the streets safe for freedom-loving adults!

Ibn Battuta said...

of course now we can debate whether the "children's homes" should be coeducational or not and which leads to inculcating "human" values....

Anonymous said...

@ anonymous 09 August, 2007 22:01

Don’t let me say you’re just a dilettante that’s trying to put words in my mouth.

Mine is a 3 part response; part 1 is about state of affairs, part 2 indirectly hints Islam would be a great religion if diligently practiced, and part 3 pays respect to good & fine Moslems of which I doubt you’re one!

Anonymous said...

I'll take rowdy kids anytime, as opposed to rowdy bachelors.

With kids, I can loosen up and be one, once in a while :)

Come on Man, you can't do that with rowdy bachelors - LOL :)

Joy be upon us all said...

Hallo,

If the majesty has divorce and becomes single he goes into a flat, o.k. I'm convienced

Joy be upon us all said...

Hallo Ibn battuta

i dont know the link but ive access to a big library, I' m not a single blogger. o.k.

Harsha said...

What if a married man worked here and his family came down every summer for 2 months on vacation. He can afford the villa but his family prefers staying back home (where ever).

so is he supposed to move in only 2 months a year and rent it out for the rest of the year?

Anonymous said...

I can't imagine a law like this coming into effect in any other city apart from Dubai. Nothing ceases to amaze me anymore with this place - the people that come up with these laws really must live in a bubble.

I am so pleased to be leaving this land of retarded laws.

Anonymous said...

I think the best approach for Dubai would be to create a subterranean infrastructure where anyone without a family or a low income can simply navigate to work along a network of tunnels from their single abode 30 ft underground. They could even have bicycle lanes for the delivery boys, who lets face are rather unsightly and don't make for good tourist videos.

Then we can have the malls free for 'family people of ethical, moral values' wander in a blissful state of shopping and grace.

How about that for a vision.

Anonymous said...

This is a great law, evacuate the bachelors from our safe neighborhoods. They've caused enough harm with their inappropriate habits.

Hairy_tooth_fairy said...

Where is Bachelor city?
Where is Mall of the Bachelors?

fellow atheist said...

Bachelor City.. that is truly an untapped market with all these evictions. This should be taken seriously! Only bachelors allowed, no families. Families get evicted (bachelor turns into family, gets the boot).

Crazy. This is absolute madness.

I don't know who comes with these laws and what the thought process has been or what the end goal could possibly be. Are they trying to create zones? Just antagonize people? What the hell is going on?

Joy be upon us all said...

Perhaps, only an assumption,

laws in a country being officially defined in European countries as a “patriarchic presidential system with traditional consultation mechanism” have mostly a very certain reason in the everyday life . . . a single bachelor with nice house and garden, a friendly and good-looking gay, perhaps a Harvard degree and having much leisure time amidst a site mostly inhabited by traditional Muslim families, living in arranged marriages, unamusing sex-life, perhaps wife-beating, he higher rang in the national administration, jealously . . . thus laws are taking place in a monarchy . . . just like in the fairy tales of Anderson, Grimm, Dickens etc.

Perhaps & Surely

Joy be upon us all said...

Sorry for my bad English

i meant guy not gay!!!!

but it would even change the spirit and purpose of the law.

o.k.

Anonymous said...

This law should apply only to Asian Bachelors, as European and Arab bachelors are generally well-behaved and contribute much more to society than Asians.

Anonymous said...

How is it that Asian bachelors don't contribute to your society and Arabs and Europeans do?. Your statement in itself is RACIST. Who is building your country, "ahem" Asians. And many may be bachelors because they left their families back in their home country.

Anonymous said...

HI EVERYONE!

Very interesting debate going on here. Bachelor city... hmm any chance of a Spinster city comming up close by?
BTW will females be allowed into Bachelor city, Bachelor Mall, Bachelor Cinema etc? Will Bachelors be allowed to have their city council? Perhaps elect a Mayoy? Perhaps it would be fun. And not as bad as we think. And we will have a wonderfully segregated society with zero crime level.
But hey what about the work place? Will there be different offices for bachelors and family folks? Lets wait and see!

Anonymous said...

Proposed site for Bachelor city

Seabee said...

anon@11.14, that's much too close to other people, it needs to be moved further into the desert.

Anonymous said...

seebee I was aiming for the empty quarter, but am sure the Saudis would have issues with that :p

SevenSummits said...

anon@11.14,
Will that be environmentally sustainable? What will it do to the already degraded desert landscape? Move us to another location please – maybe offshore? ;-)

PS: My apologies in advance to all those marine biologists

hemlock said...

will the RTA have busses running from bachelor/spinster city? umm.. road tolls/salik?

RICH_BLDG_OWNER said...

all of u just shaddaaap o.k. just shaddap dont give idea to the tenans.
if bochelor city is bilt ei wel dieeeeeee!

Tarmak said...

I think this law was made for the greedy landlord and for all greedy Real Estate own by the locals or who ever. Since they are trying to build and build and build residential building who will fill all that.
But according to them any bachelor can find accommodation in anywhere in Dubai... The Question is where? If you try to go and ask for a vacant flat they will ask you also, if you are family if not you are not allowed to lived in their building. By the way for them a
Family is composed of a father, a Mother and a child only... Go out there in the Jungle of Dubai and find out...

Hello wake up Dubai... don't be so greedy to get your ROI (return of investment) in a short period of time...

Anonymous said...

I'm glad to see other ppl find this law as ridiculous as i do. The bloody Municipality disconnected the water & electricity in my villa after only one weeks notice. When I went to the Municipality to ask for an extension they 1. treated me like a criminal 2. wouldn't give me any grace period. So I'm currently homeless due to this ludicrous city!

When did it become a crime to be single?!

Airupthere said...

2 words for them...STUPID FUCKERS!

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